Westland Heating & Air Conditioning Blog: Posts Tagged ‘Refrigerant’

Refrigerant Phaseout 2020: Everything You Need to Know

Monday, January 13th, 2020

The term “Freon” has become a household name in most areas of the country. That’s not a coincidence: this type of refrigerant has been associated with air conditioners for decades. The problem is, as we’ve grown more environmentally conscious in the last 10 to 20 years, we’ve realized that Freon is an incredibly toxic, ozone-depleting material that has escalated the degradation of the environment.

While there are some tradeoffs for this if the material provides useful for HVAC in Westlake, OH, the difference here is that there is an alternative refrigerant that functions just as well (often better) called R-410A that is thousands of magnitudes less harmful to the environment than Freon. Legislation was passed to limit the amount of Freon used, and as of January 1st of this year, production and import of R-22 (Freon’s industry name) has been completely halted.

So what does this mean for you? Keep reading and we’ll tell you.

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The Reason Your Air Conditioner Is Freezing

Monday, September 24th, 2018

evaporator-coilImagine this scenario:

Your air conditioner is acting funny one day. It doesn’t seem to be cooling your home much. You’re doubly sure it’s not cooling the home when you put your hand up to the air vent and feel very little air (despite the fact that you can hear the AC’s fan blowing). So you go to investigate, and what you find in your indoor AC unit is a giant, frozen over block of metal!

The block of metal is nothing unusual—that would be your evaporator coil. Read on to find out why a frozen evaporator coil is enough to warrant an emergency call with a North Olmsted HVAC company.

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How Does My Air Conditioner Use Refrigerant?

Monday, June 29th, 2015

Most people know that an air conditioner relies on refrigerant to run. Refrigerant is a common term that applies to a number of different chemical compounds. What most people mistakenly assume is that air conditioners consume refrigerant the way a car consumes gasoline or motor oil, and that problems with low refrigerant stem from this.

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